Protest Themes in Biden’s First 100 Days

On April 29, 2021—today—President Biden has held office for 100 days. While the president plans to mark the date by headlining a rally in Atlanta, we decided to use the occasion to look back at the major themes in U.S. protest activity in the first few months of the Biden Administration. So far, the CrowdContinue reading “Protest Themes in Biden’s First 100 Days”

FIPS Codes!

To make Crowd Counting Consortium (CCC) data easier to integrate with other datasets commonly used by scholars and journalists studying social and political behavior in the United States, we have added FIPS codes to the version shared on the Nonviolent Action Lab‘s GitHub repository (here). Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) codes are numbers that identifyContinue reading “FIPS Codes!”

Monthly Review: March 2021

So far, the Crowd Counting Consortium has recorded more than 1,800 protest events in the U.S. in March 2021, with roughly 88,000 to 125,000 participants in the events for which we were able to find information about crowd size (a little more than half of the events recorded). That’s an 80-percent increase in the numberContinue reading “Monthly Review: March 2021”

Stop Asian Hate

In the several days since a young white man shot and killed eight people—six of them women of Asian descent—at three sites near Atlanta, Georgia, vigils and other demonstrations of sadness, solidarity, frustration, and anger over racist violence and micro-aggressions targeting the Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community have mushroomed across the U.S. The chartContinue reading “Stop Asian Hate”

Say Her Name: Breonna Taylor

On the night of March 13, 2020, police in Louisville, Kentucky, shot and killed Breonna Taylor in the dark in her bed. Police officers were executing a search warrant as part of an investigation into drug trafficking with which Taylor, a Black woman and healthcare worker, had nothing to do. One year later, on Saturday,Continue reading “Say Her Name: Breonna Taylor”

It’s the Climate Change, Stupid!

One issue has dominated environmental protest activity in the U.S. for at least the past four years, and that’s climate change. The charts below show monthly counts of protest events raising environmental concerns, and sums of estimated participants in those events (with appropriate caveats), in the U.S. since January 2017, according to the Crowd CountingContinue reading “It’s the Climate Change, Stupid!”

Monthly Review: February 2021

Now that the calendar’s turned to March, we can use Crowd Counting Consortium data to offer a preliminary overview of protest activity in the U.S. in February 2021. I say “preliminary” because we’ll keep encoding events in February (and earlier and later) as new information turns up, so these numbers are subject to some change.Continue reading “Monthly Review: February 2021”

Dude, Where’s My Protest?

When you spend hours each day hunting for news reports and other public digital traces of protest events, you become acutely sensitive to the many ways in which the information you find may fail to tell the whole story, the accurate story, or even the story at all. There are lots of reasons to careContinue reading “Dude, Where’s My Protest?”

Contours of the George Floyd Uprising

We all know that the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officers on May 25, 2020, triggered a tsunami of protest activity across the United States. Just how large and broad was that wave of protests, though? How destructive was it? And how did police and right-wing counter-protesters respond to it? The Crowd CountingContinue reading “Contours of the George Floyd Uprising”

Trump-Era Themes in U.S. Protests

Under the Trump administration, what did Americans protest about? The Crowd Counting Consortium’s compiled dataset offers a few ways to answer this question. Each of the more than 61,000 records in the dataset so far represents a separate event, and each of those records includes a field summarizing what the event was about, as understoodContinue reading “Trump-Era Themes in U.S. Protests”